The Dish on Cookbooks
7/6/2017
Your ancestors didn't have a Martha Stewart or Betty Crocker to guide the way in the kitchen. Read on to discover the history of cookbooks.
Cookbooks weren’t widely used in the United States until the 19th century, and even then the recipes tended to be vague at best. Fannie Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cookbook (1896) set a new trend for precise measurements and step-by-step instructions. A flood of cookbooks followed in the early 20th century, from promotional pieces for brands such as Coca-Cola and King Arthur Flour to community and church collections. Early editions of The Joy of Cooking and the Betty Crocker series appeared in the 1930s and quickly became kitchen staples. Use these resources to stir up your own culinary expedition:
Food was a big part of our ancestors' lives! Learn about your family's culinary traditions and gather (and prepare) old recipes with help from our e-book From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes.