3 Ways to Use GEDmatch in Your DNA Research

3 Ways to Use GEDmatch in Your DNA Research

Analysis tools from testing companies aren't the only way to examine your DNA results. Here's the rundown on one of the web's most popular free tools: GEDmatch.

how to use GEDmatch to analyze your DNA test results

You’ve spent money on a DNA test for yourself and possibly one or more relatives, but what do you do with those results

once you’ve got them? How can you wring every bit of knowledge out of those results and get the most for your money?

Third-party tools (many of which are free) give genealogists more ways of exploring and analyzing their DNA test results. DNA expert and author of The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy Blaine Bettinger shares three ways you can analyze your results with GEDmatch, one of the most commonly used genetic genealogy tools.

1. Find genetic cousins in the GEDmatch database.

Unless you’ve tested at all three testing companies (23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA), your DNA isn’t being compared to all test-takers. GEDmatch, however, has thousands of test results from each of the testing companies, allowing your DNA to be compared to the DNA of those who had their DNA tested by other companies. After you’ve uploaded your own raw data to GEDmatch, you c

an compare your DNA to all those test-takers and (hopefully) identify even more genetic cousins.

2. Identify shared segments of DNA.

Not all the genetic genealogy testing companies provide information about shared segments. Each shared segment at GEDmatch, however, can be identified by chromosome number, start location, stop location, and total size. This can be helpful for genealogists interested in chromosome mapping and triangulation.

3. Analyze your DNA with other ethnicity calculators.

Biogeographical estimates, also called “ethnicity” estimates, aren’t an exact determination of your genealogical ethnicity. Instead, these calculations are just estimates based on imperfect modern-day populations. Accordingly, you shouldn’t take these estimates to the bank.Instead, look for patterns or trends among multiple ethnicity calculators at the testing companies and at GEDmatch, and focus on estimates at the continental level (Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe), which tend to be more accurate.

The image above, a screenshot from GEDmatch’s home page, displays some of the analyses GEDmatch can run. For more on tools available at GEDmatch and other third-party sites, check out The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy, available in both print and e-book versions at Family Tree Shop.

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  1. I like to read your short articles on the different topics. It helps me to check out what I have and what I need to do. I also like all the webinars and books you have available. thank you.