Ancestry DNA Introduces New Ancestor Discoveries for Genetic Genealogy Tests

Ancestry DNA Introduces New Ancestor Discoveries for Genetic Genealogy Tests

Ancestry DNA, the genetic genealogy arm of Ancestry.com, has launched New Ancestor Discoveries, a still-in-beta feature that can use your DNA matches to show you who your ancestors were. The feature builds on DNA Circles, announced late last year, which creates circles of genetically matching individuals who also...

Ancestry DNA, the genetic genealogy arm of Ancestry.com, has launched New Ancestor Discoveries, a still-in-beta feature that can use your DNA matches to show you who your ancestors were.

The feature builds on DNA Circles, announced late last year, which creates circles of genetically matching individuals who also have matching people in their Ancestry member trees.

What happens is this:

  • You take a DNA test with Ancestry DNA.
  • In six to eight weeks, you receive a notification that your results are available, and you go into your Ancestry.com account to view them.
  • On your results page, you see the faces of ancestral people who aren’t in your Ancestry member tree (if you have one), but who are in the trees of other testers whom you match:

  • You click on an ancestral person, and see a window like this, with basic information about the person and the DNA Circle that links you to this person:

  • If you click the green “Learn About” link, and you also are an Ancestry.com subscriber, you can see a Lifestory for the person, compiled from the person’s profiles in multiple public member trees on Ancestry.com. This page is accessible only through the DNA Circle or New Ancestor Discovery experience, and includes photos, records and life events about the person. It looks like this:

  • If you click the gray “See how you are related” link, you see an illustration of the circle, highlighting the individuals you match and how those matches are related to the ancestral person. The thicker the orange line, the stronger your genetic connection to a person. This is an updated presentation of DNA Circle information; you can use the tab to see a list view of circle members.

An update to DNA Circles is that they now include anyone in your tree, not just those in your direct ancestral lines. For example, if your third-great-granduncle is in your Ancestry member tree and you’re genetically related to members of his circle, you’ll be included in his circle even though you don’t descend from him.

Read more about New Ancestor Discoveries and watch a video demo on the Ancestry.com blog.

You can read Ancestry.com’s press release about New Ancestor Discoveries here.

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  1. Oh boy – Ancestry does it again. The first of new "new" ancestors has just been posted. I have the paper trail. This couple are most certainly NOT my ancestors. They are collateral but not direct. The wife is my second great grand-aunt. I am no kin to her husband whatsoever. There is apparently no way to dispute or explain this. Apparently Ancestry in all its wisdom had decided this because of someone else’s faulty research and entered family tree. How many people are going to led astray by this poor information.

  2. Same thing happened to me: one person is a descendant of one set of my third-greatgrandparents, but she’s definitely NOT my ancestor; the second person is her husband (unrelated to me) and the third person they mention has no possible relationship whatsoever. More garbage results from Ancestry. Users beware!

  3. What a sexy idea. Too bad it’s not working. If they were to use triangulated DNA segments, something good might come of this, but it doesn’t look like Ancestry is headed in that direction.

  4. The new ancestor discoveries sounds exciting until you determine that your family tree has to be public, not private. A self-proclaimed genealogist copied my tree data, adding her recurring error in a maiden name, to her client’s trees. When I confronted her with the error,she said she gets paid to do clients’ trees, and takes data from other’s ancestry public trees. That’s when I made my tree private! So, I will not be able to take advantage of this new add-on, but from comments that may not be a bad thing. I’m looking at other DNA ancestor-search programs.

  5. Carol you aren’t loosing anything. Word on the street is that way too many of these "matches" are incorrect and people are being coerced into buying a subscription to view inaccurate information. Really Ancestry this is bordering an a scam. Shame on you.