They Were Soldiers Once: Searching Military Records on FamilySearch.org

They Were Soldiers Once: Searching Military Records on FamilySearch.org

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the American Civil War and the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. Military records—such as service records, pensions, and draft registration cards (see above)—can provide valuable information about your ancestors and their military service. But what's...

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the American Civil War and the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. Military records—such as service records, pensions, and draft registration cards (see above)—can provide valuable information about your ancestors and their military service. But what’s the key to finding military records on FamilySearch.org? Guest writer and author of the Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org Dana McCullough shares three search strategies for searching FamilySearch.org’s military records collections.

Learn military history.

The United States has been involved in many military incursions throughout the years. By learning about them and when they took place, you can identify which conflict your ancestor may have served in. See the table below for a list of major US military conflicts. Note that your ancestors may have draft records available even if they weren’t deployed.

Revolutionary War 1775–1783
War of 1812 1812–1815
Mexican-American War 1846–1848
Civil War 1861–1865
Spanish American War 1898
Philippine Insurrection 1899–1902
World War I 1917–1918
World War II 1941–1945
Korean War 1950–1953
Vietnam War 1959–1973

Include residence in search criteria.

Including where your ancestor lived will help you determine whether the John Smith listed is your John Smith. In addition, many military records were recorded or arranged by state, and most military records include the soldier’s place of residence.

Add a family relationship.

Particularly when searching for pensions records, try adding a family relationship. Why? Pensions included family members such as the soldier’s widow or children. Other military records may also include family members’ name, since soldiers often had to provide information about their next of kin or a contact person back home.

Learn more tips and strategies for searching military records on FamilySearch.org by ordering your copy of the Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org today.

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