Research Secrets from the Pros: Family Tree Magazine Podcast Episode 113

Research Secrets from the Pros: Family Tree Magazine Podcast Episode 113

In our October 2017 podcast, Lisa Louise Cooke investigates tips for breaking down brick walls, knowing when to hire an expert, and chats with the FTU Dean.

Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

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In This Episode

Family Tree Magazine October Podcast 2017 Lisa Louise Cooke

  • News from the Blogosphere: Genealogy expert brick wall tips
  • Top Tips: How to know when it’s time to hire a genealogy expert
  • 101 Best Websites: Tips and help
  • Family Tree University Crash Course
  • Publisher’s Desk

Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke

Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems Podcast in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.


Top Tips

Family Tree Magazine October Podcast 2017 Lisa Louise CookeAuthor and instructor Lisa Alzo answers the question “How do I know when it’s time to hire a genealogy expert?”

Read Lisa’s Premium article “Go With a Pro” for five strategies for working with a professional genealogist.

 

 

 


David Fryxell

101 Best Websites

You can mine plenty of advice from the experts online when you know where to look. Contributing editor David A. Fryxell shares sites from our annual 101 Best Websites list that provide great genealogy tips and help.

 

 


Family Tree Magazine October Podcast 2017 Lisa Louise Cooke

Family Tree University Crash Course

Dean of Students Vanessa Wieland shares three top tips she’s learned from FTU instructors.
  1. From James M. Beidler in : Look for your German ancestral village in passenger lists and census records. The census can give clues for what year they immigrated, and the passenger lists may contain the city or village they came from. German Genealogy 101
  2. From Kerry Scott: Use Tags in Evernote to do better research. You can tag by name, date, location, record type, occupation… all on the same document. Every record note I have has the type of record tagged (such as “1920 census”) and all of the names of the people in that record. That way, when I need to see which records I have for a person, I can click on the name tag, and all the records will come up. And then, I don’t have to duplicate my work on several notes for the same census. Organize And Tag Your Data in Evernote
  3. From Sunny Morton/Shannon Combs-Bennett: Evaluate Your Source. One of the big questions to ask is, who provided the information, and how long after the event was it provided? The closer the source is to the event, the fresher and more reliable it is. Did the person who recorded it see it with their own eyes? Do we know who is reporting the source? Become a Family History Detective

 


Diane Haddad

News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad

 

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