Legislators Discuss Copyright Reform

Legislators Discuss Copyright Reform

Ever been hassled by a clerk who demands you have permission from the photographer before making copies of a 100-year-old portrait? Under current copyright law, you'll likely lose the fight with Wal-Mart's photo department. (Read more about copyright quandaries here.)Legislation working its way through the House and the Senate...

Ever been hassled by a clerk who demands you have permission from the photographer before making copies of a 100-year-old portrait? Under current copyright law, you’ll likely lose the fight with Wal-Mart’s photo department. (Read more about copyright quandaries here.)

Legislation working its way through the House and the Senate focuses on so-called “orphan works”—creations whose copyright owners cannot be identified or located. When someone wants to use or reproduce a work that is likely copyrighted, they risk being held liable for infringement; this reform aims to free up orphan works for public use.

Although artists have concerns about the current legislation, copyright reform would be a boon for family historians, museums, libraries and educational institutions. You can read more about the legislation on the website of our sister publication The Artist’s Magazine here.

Related Products

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

ALL COMMENTS

  1. Oh my, I think you are writing about me. This exact
    thing happened to me at Walmart. I wanted copies
    of 100 years + photographs to use in my family
    history album and another time they refused to
    copy an obituary card from the early 1900’s.
    Both times the sales help were very rude to me.
    It is a sad day, when my very old family photographs
    are not my property and I cannot do what I wish
    to do with my property. Let’s hope the legislators
    give us history lovers our owners rights back.