Favorite Finds: Great Depression Cooking, TV Game Shows and More

By RachelF

Need to add some genealogical fun to your weekend? Look no further! This time, our Favorite Finds are all about preserving, recording, and reviving the past.

 

Here’s what we’re loving:

 

1. YouTube Channel Celebrates Recipes and Memories from Great Depression Cook

If you haven’t visited Great Depression Cooking over on YouTube, we highly recommend you do so. Author, cook and great-grandmother Clara Cannucciari shares recipes and stories from her life in the Great Depression. Clara passed away in 2013 at the age of 98, but the channel remains active. Not only does it teach you about this important era in American history, but it is a beautiful record of Clara’s warm character that makes you feel as if you’re right there in the kitchen with her.

Read: Hard Times

2. Bakery Behind the Frisbee Flying Discs is Revived

The Connecticut bakery whose pie tins would become the world’s first Frisbees is being revived after 60 years, as reported by the ever-quirky Atlas Obscura. Our favorite part of this story is how the new owners replicated the original Frisbie pies by “seeking out feedback from people who consumed the original Frisbie pies during the 1950s.”

Read: Preserve Your Heirloom Recipes in a Family Cookbook

 

Genealogy TV

3. The History Behind Jeopardy! is Not All Fun and Games

As contestant James Holzhauer inches closer to breaking the Jeopardy! record, we discovered this article that offers an interesting look at the problematic history of  TV game shows and how Jeopardy! became (wait for it)…the answer.

Read: 8 Must-See Genealogy TV Shows

 

4. Woman Creates Unprecedented Archive of TV History

Another find from Atlas Obscura takes look at the fascinating life of Marion Stokes, an activist and archivist who quietly recorded thousands of hours of television history, creating the only collection of its kind. A new documentary about Stokes premiered this year and is currently being screened at theaters around the US.

Read: Looking for Ancestors in the Library of Congress Video Collection

 

5. BuzzFeed Employees Experiment with Genetic Genealogy Crime Solving

In the aftermath of the Golden State Killer’s arrest, a team of novice genealogists over at BuzzFeed tried to replicate the process of using genetic genealogy to track down a murderer, using their fellow BuzzFeed employees as suspects.

Read: DNA Test Kits: Is Your Privacy at Risk?