Family Tree Magazine Podcast https://www.familytreemagazine.com The Family Tree Magazine Podcast comes to you monthly from the publishers of America’s number one genealogy magazine. Each month, you’ll hear genealogy tips from our editors and experts, sneak peeks of upcoming articles, news from the blogosphere, hints from Family Tree University and much more. Tue, 30 Jul 2019 23:28:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 The Family Tree Magazine Podcast comes to you monthly from the publishers of America's number one genealogy magazine. Each month, you'll hear genealogy tips from our editors and experts, sneak peeks of upcoming articles, news from the blogosphere, hints from Family Tree University and much more. F+W Media clean episodic F+W Media podcasts@fwmedia.com podcasts@fwmedia.com (F+W Media) F+W Media, All Rights Reserved. The leading family history magazine for researching Genealogy. Helping to discover, preserve, and celebrate family history. Family Tree Magazine Podcast https://www.familytreemagazine.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg https://www.familytreemagazine.com Monthly Online Records Roundup March 2019 Genealogy Podcast Episode 130 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/online-records-roundup-march-2019-genealogy-podcast-episode-130/ Fri, 15 Mar 2019 19:05:29 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=30864 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/online-records-roundup-march-2019-genealogy-podcast-episode-130/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/online-records-roundup-march-2019-genealogy-podcast-episode-130/feed/ 0 <p>Discover valuable resources for online records with this month's genealogy podcast. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/online-records-roundup-march-2019-genealogy-podcast-episode-130/">Online Records Roundup March 2019 Genealogy Podcast Episode 130</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This month’s theme: online records

This month, we’re talking about finding online records with your host, Lisa Louise Cooke.

This Month in Family History with Andrew Koch

FDR delivers his first “fireside chat” on the radio, Mar. 12, 1933

This month in 1933: Just eight days after his inauguration (in which he famously said “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself”), President Franklin Delano Roosevelt took to the airwaves in the first of his fireside chats. In the 13-minute-and-42-second address, Roosevelt explained the basics of the banking crisis two weeks prior, and outlined what his administration was doing to prevent the crisis from getting worse.

Sources:

Naturalization Records Online

Rich Venezia, founder of Rich Roots Genealogy joins Lisa to discuss finding naturalization records online.

Rich is the founder of Rich Roots Genealogy. He specializes in 20th-century immigrant ancestry, and he assists clients with dual citizenship applications for Ireland and Italy. He’s a proud Italian dual citizen and spoke about “How to Grow Empathy From Uncovering Your Roots” at TEDx Pittsburgh 2017. He was a member of the research team of the PBS TV show Genealogy Roadshow for two seasons and consulted on The Travel Channel’s Follow Your Past.


DNA Deconstructed: GEDMatch and Genesis

Shannon Combs-Bennett is the instructor for Mastering Family Tree Maker

Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett guides you through the GEDmatch migration to Genesis.

To learn more about the new site, check out these tutorials:


Best Genealogy Websites

Family Tree University instructor Donna Moughty tells us about one of her favorite website’s for Irish records online, John Grenham’s website Irish Ancestors.


Stories from the Stacks

In this episode, we virtually roam the aisles of the Houston TX Public Library’s Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research. Susan Kaufman is the Senior Manager there and she has more than 30 years of experience as a genealogy librarian.

Susan is a genealogy conference speaker and currently serves as the Texas State Genealogical Society’s Director of Education.

How to navigate your way to their online genealogical records:

  1. Visit Houston Library.
  2. Click Locations and Hours
  3. Scroll down and click Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research
  4. Click the red button Clayton Library’s Collections and Services
  5. Scroll down and click the Collections card
  6. Click Online Resources (last link in the bullet list) or scroll down to find Online Resources

This Just In

It’s easier than ever to create a book about your family history. Family Tree Magazine Contributing Editor and Family Tree University instructor Sunny Morton explains how you can do it in just three days. Sign up for the workshop today! It runs April 12 – 14, 2019.


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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Discover valuable resources for online records with this month's genealogy podcast. Discover valuable resources for online records with this month's genealogy podcast. F+W Media clean 49:04
Gain Major Genealogy Problem-solving Skills | February 2019 Podcast https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-february-2019-podcast/ Tue, 19 Feb 2019 19:59:49 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=30642 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-february-2019-podcast/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-february-2019-podcast/feed/ 0 <p>Add these genealogy problem-solving tricks and strategies to your research arsenal with this February 2019 podcast. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-february-2019-podcast/">Gain Major Genealogy Problem-solving Skills | February 2019 Podcast</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

February 2019 Podcast - Problem-solving

Discover some powerful genealogy problem-solving techniques with your host, Lisa Louise Cooke.

This Month in Family History with Andrew Koch

The Battle of Guadalcanal ends, Feb. 9, 1943

After six months of fighting, the Japanese finally surrendered the island of Guadalcanal, one of the Solomon Islands, on Feb. 9. The Allied victory marked a turning point in the Pacific campaign of World War II. Along with the Battle of Midway in June 1942, the Battle of Guadalcanal set the Japanese on their back heels and hindered their further expansion. For the rest of the war, Japan was on the defensive.

Life on the island during the battle had been bleak. Allied soldiers struggled in the hot and humid climate, and tropical diseases such as malaria sidelined as many as two-thirds of Allied divisions at a time. Regular Japanese bombardment kept Allied troops from feeling truly secure in the drawn-out campaign.

How to find the records

You can request World War Two service records (called Official Military Personnel Files) from the National Archives. A 1973 fire at a records center in St. Louis destroyed 75 to 80 percent of Army and Air Force personnel records. However, you can still find World War II army enlistment records online at the National Archives’ Access to Archival Databases.

Sources:

Genealogy Problem-solving with Cluster Genealogy

Deborah Abbott, Cluster GenealogyDeborah A. Abbott, Ph.D. joins Lisa to discuss a powerful problem-solving reearch technique called Cluster Research.

Cluster research is the practice of searching beyond your ancestor. By researching the friends, neighbors, and associates of your ancestor, you may uncover new leads and new connections that can solve brick walls.

Deborah Abbott, PhD is a professional genealogist, specializing in genealogical methodology, manuscript collections and African American family research. A Trustee on the Board of the Ohio Genealogical Society (OGS), she is also a member of the Cuyahoga County Ohio Archives Advisory Commission, and of the Board of Directors for the Federation of Genealogy Societies (FGS). Moreover, Dr. Abbott is an affiliate with the Kentucky-Tennessee Associates, past president of the African American Genealogical Society, Cleveland, Ohio and a retired professor of Counseling from Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland. She holds both the BS and M.Ed. degrees from Tuskegee University in Alabama and the PhD degree from Kent State University in Ohio.

Want to see Dr. Abbott put cluster research in action? Join the 2019 Spring Virtual Conference, where you’ll get access to a brand-new presentation from Dr. Abbott, along with 15 other videos, live Q&As, and activities galore to help you with your problem-solving.

2019 Spring Virtual Genealogy Conference creative


DNA Deconstructed

Shannon Combs-Bennett is the instructor for Mastering Family Tree MakerFamily Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett guides you through a particularly vexing DNA problem.

What to do when your match doesn’t have a tree? This can be a huge stumbling block for many researchers, but it doesn’t have to be. Just because they do not have a tree on the DNA site you are looking at, doesn’t mean they do not have a tree uploaded somewhere else. This will take a bit of detective work on your part, but your efforts may be rewarded.

There are several ways to do this. First, you want to look online at other DNA testing sites and online tree sites for the matches name. Their name may be a user name, which many people use consistently between platforms or a variation of their real name. Often a simple Google search will do the trick.

Check the shared matches for trees

Next, check to see if they share DNA with another match which does have a tree. Because so many DNA companies offer ways to see who else you and a specific person share DNA with, you may be able to find where they fit in through a shared match. Shared matches, in-common with, and other tools can help you determine how you are related to someone. If they share DNA with you and someone else (or a group of someones) you now know you can start with the genealogy research. This is especially true when the matches share surnames, or even better, the same familial lines.

Then, when all else fails, ask! Sometimes matches without trees are administered by someone else. Maybe they have not linked the DNA to a tree yet, or the person does not know how. Sometimes a simple email can fix the situation. Do not give up though if you do not hear back from someone right away. Sometimes it takes days, months, or even years. All sorts of reasons can prevent someone from writing back to you.


Best Genealogy Websites

Gena Ortega, Virtual Conference ModeratorGena Philibert-Ortega joins us to talk about using newspaper research in our genealogy problem-solving.

Another way to solve genealogical problems is to find sources that can fill in the gaps in your ancestor’s history. Family history writer, author and Family Tree University instructor Gena Philibert-Ortega returns to the show to discuss one of her favorite genealogy websites that can do just that: GenealogyBank.com.

Gena’s Tips:

  • Create a search plan
  • Write down all of the versions of a person’s name
  • Include and exclude words as you search
  • Sometimes it helps to specify the state and newspaper
  • Use the map of the U.S. on the home page to see which newspapers are available and from what time periods.
  • GenealogyBank now includes the ability to save your search and save items to a folder.
  • You can download articles to PDF or JPG

Stories from the Stacks

Discover valuable collections in archives and libraries.

Toni Carrier, Director of The International African-American Museum Center for Family History, and Robin Foster Coordinator of Genealogy Education at the museum, join Lisa on the show. They provide an overview of the types of records you will find there on the website in their “Digital Library” and you can donate items from your own collection.

The International African American Museum is slated to open in Charleston, SC in 2020.


This Just In

Andrew Koch discusses the newly updated book,Family Tree Problem Solver, 3rd Edition.


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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Add these genealogy problem-solving tricks and strategies to your research arsenal with this February 2019 podcast. Add these genealogy problem-solving tricks and strategies to your research arsenal with this February 2019 podcast. F+W Media clean 42:41
January 2019 Podcast: Make 2019 Your Most Organized Year Yet https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/january-2019-podcast-make-2019-your-most-organized-year-yet/ Fri, 18 Jan 2019 17:35:38 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=30412 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/january-2019-podcast-make-2019-your-most-organized-year-yet/#comments https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/january-2019-podcast-make-2019-your-most-organized-year-yet/feed/ 4 <p>Get the key genealogy organization tricks to make 2019 your best year yet. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/january-2019-podcast-make-2019-your-most-organized-year-yet/">January 2019 Podcast: Make 2019 Your Most Organized Year Yet</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> 2019 Genealogy Organization Tricks

Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

You’ll love all of the genealogy organization tricks and techniques contained in this podcast episode, designed to help you make 2019 your best year yet.


This Month in Family History

Editor Andrew Kock shares a brief history of Ellis Island

This month in 1892: Ellis Island opened its gates for the first time. Irish teenager Annie Moore became the first immigrant to pass through the port. Over the next 62 years, Ellis Island processed more than 12 million immigrants, making it the largest port of immigration in the country.

Ellis Island served as a replacement to Castle Garden, which had been used by the New York State government to process immigrants since 1855. The federal government recognized Castle Garden’s facilities were inadequate, and so set out to build a larger station to meet the demand.

Ellis Island closed in 1954. Now, the immigration center is a museum operated by the Liberty Ellis Foundation. Visitors to the museum can view the island’s facilities and learn about the immigration process, plus find records of their ancestors who stepped off ships in the island’s port. You can also search a database of Ellis Island passengers at LibertyEllisFoundation.org

Sources:

Ellis Island History
Huffington Post article
Castle Gardens

Get more tips for searching New York passenger lists.


Feature

Author, Family Tree University instructor, and genealogical researcher Gena Philibert-Ortega discusses why research logs matter, how they can keep you organized and why they aren’t as boring as you think!
Gena Ortega, Virtual Conference Moderator

Tools mentioned for research logs:


Plus, if you sign up for the course, you’ll get access to the live webinar, Research Log Tricks from the Pros, built into the price.


DNA Deconstructed

Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett guides you on how to simplify and organize your DNA test results.

Organizing your DNA results really is not complicated. Just like all other forms of organization for genealogy research, it simply takes time, patience, and the commitment to keep it up.

It helps to understand that being organized will help you with your analysis and keep you on track for your DNA research goals. Most of you will want to organize and track the same types of items. For example:

  • Testing information
  • Matches
  • Contact information

Your project — or what you want to do with the DNA results you are collecting — will determine how you store it. Spreadsheets are not the only tool you can use, but Shannon finds them essential to her research. She keeps them online when she’s working on a project with other researchers.

 


Best Genealogy Websites

Genealogy Gophers was started by folks who wanted to make family history easier, faster, and FUN! The site features a unique interface that searches the 80,000+ digitized books at FamilySearch.

Founder Dallan Quass is the principal developer of GenGophers.comWeRelate.org, and most recently RootsFinder.com. Prior to writing family history software, he was a co-founder of WhizBang! Labs, FlipDog.com (acquired by Monster.com), and Junglee (acquired by Amazon.com). He has a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University and B.S. and M.S. degrees from Brigham Young University.

Discover more of the Best Genealogy Websites here.
Genealogy Gophers


Stories from the Stacks

In this segment of this month’s podcast, you’ll hear all about the collections housed in the Mid-Continent Public Library’s Midwest Genealogy Center. Cheryl A. Lang, MLS, Midwest Genealogy Center Manager, gives you some great tips for what to expect when you visit.

Midwest Genealogy Center
Mid-Continent Public Library
3440 S. Lee’s Summit Road
Independence, MO  64055
816.252.7228
http://midwestgenealogycenter.org

Highlights:

  • 50,000 sq. ft facility
  • Free standing branch of the Mid-Continent Public Library
  • 200,000 books, 10% of which can be checked out through inter-library loan.
  • Collections include city directories, microfilm, microfiche and books that cannot be digitized due to copyright, international resources, and a vast collection of Kentucky tax list records.
  • Free classes onsite

Tips:

  • Start online with the catalogue
  • Make a list of counties and surnames and search for them in the catalogue

Prioritize items that can only be accessed in person.


This Just In

Vanessa Wieland discusses the upcoming Family Tree University course Tricks to Tell Your Ancestor’s Story, instructed by Nancy Hendrickson.
Ancestor's Story Workshop


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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Get the key genealogy organization tricks to make 2019 your best year yet. Get the key genealogy organization tricks to make 2019 your best year yet. F+W Media clean 43:34
The 2018 Genealogy Year in Review: Episode 127 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/2018-genealogy-review-episode-127/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 19:48:27 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=30261 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/2018-genealogy-review-episode-127/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/2018-genealogy-review-episode-127/feed/ 0 <p>2018 has been a busy year in the genealogy world! We're wrapping it up with a recap, and chatting about what we look forward to in 2019. Join us!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/2018-genealogy-review-episode-127/">The 2018 Genealogy Year in Review: Episode 127</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p>
2018 Genealogy
Wooden blocks with number 2019, Christmas tree background. (Credit: Getty Images)
Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This Month in Family History

Andrew covers the history Monroe Doctrine

This month in 1823: US President James Monroe declared that any attempt by a European power to create new colonies in the Western Hemisphere would be considered a hostile act against the United States. The proclamation, given before Congress on Dec. 2, 1823, became known as the Monroe Doctrine.

As part of this new foreign policy, the United States vowed to respect existing European colonies in the region and not to interfere in wars between European powers. The declaration reinforced the separation between the New and Old Worlds, and also left the door open for the United States to continue expanding west without fear of competition from other world powers.

The policy change came shortly after most countries in Central and South America gained their independence from Spain. Monroe and his secretary of state, John Quincy Adams, were concerned that Spain (along with France) would attempt to recolonize the region. And so, they decided to firmly assert the United States’ role as protectorate of the Western Hemisphere.

Sources

https://www.britannica.com/event/Monroe-Doctrine

https://history.state.gov/milestones/1801-1829/monroe

https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=23


Feature

The Biggest DNA Development / Trends for 2018

The biggest development in the field was the use of DNA and genealogy to solve cold case crimes across the US. Leaving your personal feelings and the ethical debate behind, bringing the use of genealogy coupled with genetics to the attention of the public had an amazing effect. I answered many questions from people who had never thought about genealogy before who were now intrigued by what their DNA, and their genealogy, held.

When I was recently in Glasgow, Scotland I talked to a group of people at a local café about DNA testing for a good hour. Regular people are picking up DNA testing kits out of curiosity, and many I found out are eager to learn about cousins over here. With ancestry DNA tests available in 36 countries the trend in making contacts with distant cousins can only increase.

Last spring DNA Painter made a splash with its incredible website. For those who have not heard of it before, this website allows you to “paint” your chromosome with segments as you identify them. The process gives you a colorful chart of ancestral DNA segments which can be helpful as you identify other descendants of common ancestors. Plus, you can figure out exactly which bits of you came from whom.

The most recent development in 2018 came in November from Genetic Affairs. This program takes your results from AncestryDNA, FamilyTreeDNA, and 23andMe, collates your matches, and then emails them to you. Then there is the AutoClustering function that many people have lost their minds over. While this portion of the site is not free, it shows the user a graphic of all three-way matches in your list. This is not verified triangulation, but you can figure that out easily enough. Just be warned, some people have lost whole weekends playing with the software!

Finally, MyHeritage held an all genetic genealogy conference in Oslo, Norway this past November. While it is not the only one of its kind, there is also the Family Tree DNA conference in Houston and the i4gg conference in San Diego, this one was geared more to general users and made their live streaming videos free to view. While a specialty part of the genealogy community, genetics can be accessible by all.


DNA Deconstructed

Top Gen Stories of 2018 and a look ahead to 2019 With Andrew Koch, Editor Family Tree Magazine

Some of the top stories of 2018:

Looking ahead at 2019, here’s what Andrew sees happening in the genealogy space:

  • Further focus on privacy

Best Genealogy Websites

Author Rick Crume shares some of his favorite websites from the 75 Best Free Websites to Trace American Ancestors article in the December 2018 issue of the magazine.

Get the digital issue

Get the print issue


Stories from the Stacks

Lisa’s special guest: David Rencher, Director of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New in 2018:

  • Now open Saturday evenings 5:00 – 9:00 PM
  • They are currently prototyping a new ProScan Reader workstation that allows you to work a variety of materials in one location including digitized books.
  • They’ve been working on bringing physical books back into the library. Previously digitized books were not destroyed as previously thought, but rather the bindings were cut off and they were put into storage.

Coming in 2019:

  • Hours will be expanding. The library will be closed for only four major holidays.
  • Expansion of reference desk assistance. Plan ahead and take advantage of working with an expert one on one, as well as pre-ordering Granite vault films for use in the library.

 


This Just In

Family Tree University Dean Vanessa Weiland shares a new online course that’s going to help you get hands-on with your genealogy organization in 2019 Genealogy Organization Bootcamp Online Course 


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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The post The 2018 Genealogy Year in Review: Episode 127 appeared first on Family Tree.

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2018 has been a busy year in the genealogy world! We're wrapping it up with a recap, and chatting about what we look forward to in 2019. Join us! 2018 has been a busy year in the genealogy world! We're wrapping it up with a recap, and chatting about what we look forward to in 2019. Join us! F+W Media clean 28:34
Exploring Your UK Ancestry: Episode 126 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/exploring-your-uk-ancestry-episode-126/ Tue, 27 Nov 2018 18:34:47 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=30101 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/exploring-your-uk-ancestry-episode-126/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/exploring-your-uk-ancestry-episode-126/feed/ 0 <p>If you have any UK ancestry, you won't want to miss this episode! Lisa and her guests discuss the best UK websites, the genes that make up the British Isles, and much more!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/exploring-your-uk-ancestry-episode-126/">Exploring Your UK Ancestry: Episode 126</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p>
UK Ancestry
Equinox sunrise with a hawthorn tree above valley fog. English Peak District National Park. UK. Credit: Getty Images
Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This Month in Family History

Andrew provides a quick look at a major event that impacted your family history: the end of World War I.


Feature

Author Rick Crume explains how researching your family history in England and Wales has never been easier. Rick shares some of the reasons why from his new upcoming article in Family Tree Magazine.

Rick’s website recommendations:

FreeReg

This terrific site provides free access to transcribed baptism, marriage and burial records from parish registers, nonconformist records and other sources. Operated by volunteers and regularly updated, FreeReg has more than 40 million records from across the United Kingdom.

FamilySearch Research Wiki

Made up of articles contributed by the public, the Research Wiki has especially useful guides to family history research in England and Wales.

GENUKI

Provides extensive information on genealogy resources for the United Kingdom and Ireland. The church database can pinpoint a parish on a map or produce a list of nearby parishes. Once you find your ancestors in one parish, you might work outward in the surrounding parishes to find other references to the family. The homepage also has links to family history societies.


DNA Deconstructed

Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett discusses genes that make up the British Isles.

In July 2016 a study reported that there were 26 ethnicities going back 500 years for Great Britain. Considering the global impact, the British people had on the world, is that any surprise? Besides British and Irish traits, for test takers in the UK the other top percentages were Europe West, Scandinavian, and Iberian Peninsula. If we broke the study into smaller areas those numbers did change (reflecting the immigrations in and out of that area) and other ethnicities were counted such as Finland, Italy, Jewish, and Russia.

Living DNA analyzes your segments looking for clues into your past allowing their computer algorithm to determine which of the 21 regions of the UK your family came from. Their program looks at linked DNA, which they refer to as “constellations” to help determine the areas your family most likely descended from. They really take into account migration history of the peoples who came to the islands into account too. That is important if you are trying to figure out why you have such a high Scandinavian percentage.

Resources:

DNA of the nation revealed…and we’re not as “British” as we thinkAncestry.com

The first DNA test to give you a breakdown of your ancestry across the UK – LivingDNA

A Genetic Map of Britain – Oxford University Museum of Natural History Blog

Recent University of Oxford Study Sheds Light on Estimating Great Britain Ethnicity – Ancestry Blog


Best Genealogy Websites

Author David Fryxell covers the top databases for British Genealogy from the 101 Best Websites for Genealogy:

  • Findmypast.com
  • Familyrelatives.com
  • British newspaper archive
  • British National Archives
  • Genuki
  • Freeukgenealogy.org.uk

Check out the entire list!


Stories from the Stacks

When we head to any library it’s important to be prepared so we can make the most of our visit. Allison DePrey Singleton, Genealogy Librarian at the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center provides tips for genealogists for making the most of their research time at the library:


This Just In

genealogy problem solving

Amanda Epperson joins Lisa on the show to share strategies for researching your Scottish family history from her new book, The Family Tree Scottish Genealogy Guide; How to Trace Your Family Tree in Scotland.

Since completing her Ph.D. in history from the University of Glasgow in 2003, Amanda has taught history at the college level, researched and edited family histories, most recently for Genealogists.com, and written articles for a variety of publications including Family Tree Magazine and Your Genealogy Today. She blogs occasionally at the Scottish Emigration Blog.


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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If you have any UK ancestry, you won't want to miss this episode! Lisa and her guests discuss the best UK websites, the genes that make up the British Isles, and much more! If you have any UK ancestry, you won't want to miss this episode! Lisa and her guests discuss the best UK websites, the genes that make up the British Isles, and much more! F+W Media clean 39:52
Genealogy Problem Solving: Episode 125 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-episode-125/ Tue, 30 Oct 2018 15:59:53 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=29799 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-episode-125/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-episode-125/feed/ 0 <p>This month, we’re sharing strategies for your biggest genealogy problems, discussing the difference between mitochondrial DNA and the X-Chromosome, and looking at FamilySearch’s Communities. Grab your headphones!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/genealogy-problem-solving-episode-125/">Genealogy Problem Solving: Episode 125</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> genealogy problem solving
Hands Connecting Jigsaw Puzzle Pieces
Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This Month in Family History

Andrew brings us back in time to the Chicago Fire of 1871.

If you have ancestors who lived in or around the city in the early 1870s, look for property records before and after the Fire to see how this disaster may have affected your relatives.

Sources:


Feature

Do you have some problem ancestors? Family Tree Magazine Editor Diane Haddad provides strategies for finding problem ancestors:

  • Building out your tree by adding collateral family members
  • Creating a timeline
  • Educating yourself on locations

Resource: Six Ancestors in Six Days bootcamp


DNA Deconstructed

Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett helps us understand a common problem in understanding our DNA results: Confusing mitochondrial DNA and the X-Chromosome.

The X-Chromosome is one of the two sex chromosomes in our body (the other being the Y-Chromosome). A person who has an X and a Y is genetically male, and a person who has two X chromosomes is genetically female. Now, there are nuances to this due to some genetic diseases in humans, but we are going to keep this simple. During reproduction a man will pass down an X or a Y chromosome to his child where as a woman can only pass on an X. Everyone has at least one X-Chromosome.

Similarly, everyone has mitochondrial DNA. A woman passes her mitochondrial DNA to all of her children. But unlike an X-Chromosome, men will not pass this information on. Mitochondrial DNA is found in the mitochondria, an organelle floating in the cytoplasm of our cells and not in the nucleus like the X-Chromosome. This is important to remember!

Why is it important? Because it will help you understand how they are inherited and why they are different. You see, an egg is a cell, and as such contains all the organelles a cell needs to survive. This includes mitochondria. Inside the cell is the nucleus which contains the autosomal chromosomes and the X-chromosome a woman will pass on. Sperm, on the other hand, is a specialized cell which contains the genetic material found in a nucleus, and this does not pass on mitochondria.

So, while the X-Chromosome and mitochondrial DNA can be associated with the women in your family they are inherited very differently and can tell you different information. The X-chromosome information is found with autosomal DNA data from an autosomal DNA test. As with any autosomal DNA test an X-Chromosome can give you information on males and females in your family tree. You will not find that information when you take a mitochondrial DNA test, which is a separate test. It gives you ancestral information solely on your direct maternal line. No other lines are associated with mitochondrial DNA tests.


Best Genealogy Websites

Author James M. Beidler offers up three great reasons to use FamilySearch’s Communities:

  1. Getting answers from others including Family History Library staff
  2. Sharing your expertise to help other genealogists
  3. The convenient weekly email summary on groups you follow.

Stories from the Stacks

When we head to any library it’s important to be prepared so we can make the most of our visit. Allison DePrey Singleton, Genealogy Librarian at the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center provides tips for genealogists for making the most of their research time at the library:


This Just In

genealogy problem solving

The Family Tree Scottish Genealogy Guide by Amanda Epperson


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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This month, we’re sharing strategies for your biggest genealogy problems, discussing the difference between mitochondrial DNA and the X-Chromosome, and looking at FamilySearch’s Communities. Grab your headphones! This month, we’re sharing strategies for your biggest genealogy problems, discussing the difference between mitochondrial DNA and the X-Chromosome, and looking at FamilySearch’s Communities. Grab your headphones! F+W Media clean 31:51
Immigration and our Ancestors: Episode 124 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/immigration/immigration-episode-124/ Tue, 02 Oct 2018 07:00:24 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=29580 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/immigration/immigration-episode-124/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/immigration/immigration-episode-124/feed/ 0 <p>This month we’re discussing unusual immigration records that you might not have thought to check, and heading over to the Cincinnati public library where we chat with the manager of of the Genealogy and Local History Department. Plus, find out which websites are best for saving and sharing your research. And much more!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/immigration/immigration-episode-124/">Immigration and our Ancestors: Episode 124</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> immigration research podcast

Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This Month in Family History

Family Tree editor Andrew Koch shares a genealogically important event that took place this month in years past – the Naturalization Act of 1906.

National Archives website


Feature

Guest: Rich Venezia

Rich is the founder of Rich Roots Genealogy. He specializes in 20th-century immigrant ancestry, and he assists clients with dual citizenship applications for Ireland and Italy. He’s a proud Italian dual citizen, and spoke about “How to Grow Empathy From Uncovering Your Roots” at TEDx Pittsburgh 2017. He was a member of the research team of the PBS TV show Genealogy Roadshow for two seasons, and consulted on The Travel Channel’s “Follow Your Past”.

Alien Registration Records

Passport Applications

City Marriage Returns


DNA Deconstructed

Shannon Combs-Bennett answers the question: “Why don’t I show DNA for a region that I know I have ancestors from?”

  • Keep in mind that these results show you only the information you inherited from your ancestors. Due to a process called recombination, the DNA passed down to each generation is a new combination of genes and only a portion of the parent’s DNA. This means your genetic family tree and genealogical family tree will not match 100%. It all depends on what you inherited from your parents, they inherited from their parents, and so on back.
  • Ethnicity analysis is constantly begin refined. We are lucky if you think about. As we study genealogy and genetics we are also watching science develop. As the companies learn more about ethnicity traits and control groups they put out new information on their websites. For example, AncestryDNA released new ethnicity results to their customers the beginning of September. If you test there you can compare your old results with the new ones. It is obvious by looking at them side by side how they are refining and developing the science.

The take away is this: ethnicity results will only show what you inherited. Since the science is being developed and refined as we speak expect your results to change over time.


Best Genealogy Websites

Author Dave Fryxell shares the Best Websites for Saving and Sharing from the 101 Best Websites list:

Sharing and Social Media:

Facebook: Recent controversies aside, the world’s biggest social-networking site can connect you with cousins as well as with your favorite genealogy institutions.

GEDMatch: Sort of a matchmaking site for genetic genealogy, here free registration lets you match your autosomal DNA (atDNA) results with others who’ve uploaded data from AncestryDNA, 23andMe or Family Tree DNA’s Family Finder.

Geni: Geni’s World Family Tree connects more than 120 million individuals. It’s free to add your own family and invite kin to collaborate.

Pinterest: Share anything visual with this online tagboard, from family photos to census images.

YouTube: Your favorite Family Tree Magazine authors, “Genealogy Roadshow” and other family-history TV shows, Ancestry experts and more are among the quarter-million videos that pop up when you search for “genealogy.” Join the DNA Detective Facebook group. There you’ll find Search Angels who will make contacts for you as a third party.


Stories from the Stacks

Larry Richmond is the Manager of the Genealogy and Local History Department of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County where he has worked since 2004, and his responsibilities include the library’s digitation efforts and special collections. The digital collection currently includes over 56,000 items, and be sure to check back because they add 20,000 pages every month!

We discuss three collections in today’s episode:

  1. The Disabled American Veterans is a preeminent veterans organization that was founded in Cincinnati in 1919. We have digitized their newsletters from the 1940s and 1950s. So, if anyone is interested in the DAV, veterans issues, or even specific veterans, this is an excellent resource.
  2. Indigent Burial Records for Hamilton County Ohio. Spanning from 1931 through 1990, these fascinating records shed light on those whose families could not afford to bury them.
  3. African American Society Columns is a project that we’ve just gotten started but will be a tremendous resource for genealogist researching African American relatives in Cincinnati in the late 19th Century. From 1884 through 1896 the Cincinnati Commercial Gazette, Cincinnati Enquirer, and the Cincinnati Times-Star each ran a weekly “Our Colored Citizen” column. This is a remarkable record of the church, civic, fraternal organizations, and businesses of leading African Americans of the time.

Visit the library:

http://digital.cincinnatilibrary.org/digital/ 

Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

800 Vine StreetCincinnati, OH 45202


This Just In

immigration research podcast

This Just In! Editor Diane Haddad tells us about a new book at Family Tree Magazine called the Family Tree Factbook.

This convenient, timesaving collection of genealogy hacks gathers the best resources, tips, lists and need-to-know facts from the experts at Family Tree Magazine. Inside, you’ll find fast facts about a variety of family history topics, such as important dates in US history, the different kinds of DNA tests, and how to use the best genealogy websites.


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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This month we’re discussing unusual immigration records that you might not have thought to check, and heading over to the Cincinnati public library where we chat with the manager of of the Genealogy and Local History Department. Plus, This month we’re discussing unusual immigration records that you might not have thought to check, and heading over to the Cincinnati public library where we chat with the manager of of the Genealogy and Local History Department. Plus, find out which websites are best for saving and sharing your research. And much more! F+W Media clean 43:19
Best Genealogy Websites of 2018 (Live from FGS): Episode 123 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy-websites/best-genealogy-websites-podcast-episode-123/ Fri, 31 Aug 2018 14:00:52 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=29348 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy-websites/best-genealogy-websites-podcast-episode-123/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy-websites/best-genealogy-websites-podcast-episode-123/feed/ 0 <p>Recorded live at the FGS conference in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, it's our annual Best Genealogy Websites episode. We're discussing our 101 best sites list, interviewing Daniel Horowitz from MyHeritage, chatting with Rick Voight from Vivid-Pix and much more. Don't miss this episode!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy-websites/best-genealogy-websites-podcast-episode-123/">Best Genealogy Websites of 2018 (Live from FGS): Episode 123</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> best genealogy websites podcast

Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This Month in Family History

Online content direct Ashlee Peck joins us to discuss the building of the Berlin Wall and its impact on genealogy research.

Two possible impacts to your research:

  1. Many families were separated by the wall, some of them for the full 28 years that the wall was in place. There are cases of expectant mothers and fathers being divided by the wall, leading to children not meeting their father until the wall fell. In some cases, it was too late and difficult for the children to develop relationships with their fathers at this point. In addition to children not being with their parents, many couples relationships did not survive the division, with many eventually moving on and finding a new partner or starting another family.
  2. The wall is that many people began to lie about what part of Berlin they were initially from, out of fear of being separated from family and friends. This can lead to misleading information in your research of records from the time period.

Social Media Minute

Why you should follow your DNA testing company on social media

1. Blog updates

Most DNA testing companies post social updates sharing their newest blog articles. This is an excellent way to get thorough explanations of updates to DNA results as well as new additions to the websites.

Along with their own blogs, they also often share great stories and case studies.

2. Take advantage of groups and communities

Many DNA testing companies take advantage of the community and group features of their social sites, offering followers a place to interact with each other and ask questions.

3. Discover sales and genealogy record offers

Companies will use their social media pages to promote their services and products, but this can give genealogists a way to stay on top of new record releases, special sales and discounts. Fold3, the military records site Ancestry runs, is particularly good about blogging when they are offer

“Like” the Family Tree Magazine Facebook page


Feature: Catching Up With Daniel Horowitz

best genealogy websites podcast

Daniel Horowitz, Head Genealogist at MyHeritage.com provides a run-down of the latest advances at the popular genealogy website:

Updated records

New Filtering System for DNA Matches

New family reunions

Daniel Horowitz is the genealogy expert at MyHeritage. He provides key contributions, liaising with genealogy societies, bloggers, and media, as well as lecturing and attending conferences around the world. Dedicated to the study of genealogy since 1986, Daniel was the study guide editor and instructor for the project “Searching for My Roots” in his native Venezuela. He holds board level positions at the Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA).


DNA Deconstructed

Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett discusses websites for furthering your DNA analysis.

DNA Painter

DNA Painter was released this past spring to much fan-fare in the genetic genealogy community. This website allows you to color or “paint” segments of a chromosome to identify a specific ancestor or sets of ancestors. If you are a visual person like I am this is a great to see how segments of DNA show up across chromosomes. It is very easy to use. There are tutorials on the page and a Facebook group if you get stuck.

Even better the website has a feature which utilizes Blaine Bettinger’ s Shared Chromosome chart. On this section of the website you can type in the amount of shared centimorgans you and a DNA match have in common. The program will highlight on the chart all possible relationships the two of you have.

Pedigree Thief (Google Chrome plugin)

This application collects family tree data from websites such as Ancestry, Family Tree DNA, Genie, and MyHeritage that I know of. However, there could be more. It then reads the data and creates an ahentafel chart for you. Even better, if you navigate to your DNA matches page the application will gather that information together for you and create a CSV file of them. Ready-made spreadsheet.

Go to the Google Play store on your desktop and install the application. An icon of a tree wearing a mask will appear on your toolbar. If the icon is greyed out, the application will not work on the website you are viewing. If it is in color, you are good to go. Simply click the icon and Pedigree Thief will do the rest.


Best Genealogy Websites

Join Ashlee and I as we discuss the 2018 Best Genealogy Websites list!

If you’d like to access the full 2018 list from our website, you can head to our Best Genealogy Websites page, which you can easily link to from our header from any page on our site. You can then use the drop down to select “101 Best Websites 2018” to see the full list, which includes links, descriptions, and a peek of what their homepage looks like.

We hope you love this years list as much as we do!


Our Sponsor for this Episode: Vivid-Pix RESTORE

We’re thrilled to have had the opportunity to interview Vivid-Pix co-founder Rick Voight during our live recording at FGS. Tune-in as we discuss Vivid-Pix RESTORE.

If you have old family photos that need touching up, Vivid-Pix RESTORE is the perfect solution. This imaging software allows you to restore scanned prints, slides, documents, and digital camera photos in seconds. PLUS – it’s super easy to use.

Even better – you can try it out yourself for free! Just head over to their website to download the software and try it out on 10 photographs for free!


This Just In

The Dean of Family Tree University, Vanessa Weiland, along with instructor Shannon-Comb Bennett provide an insider’s look at the upcoming Family Tree University Fall Virtual Conference. Reserve your spot today!

Invest in your family history with the 2018 Fall Virtual Genealogy Conference, sponsored by Vivid-Pix


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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The post Best Genealogy Websites of 2018 (Live from FGS): Episode 123 appeared first on Family Tree.

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Recorded live at the FGS conference in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, it's our annual Best Genealogy Websites episode. We're discussing our 101 best sites list, interviewing Daniel Horowitz from MyHeritage, chatting with Rick Voight from Vivid-Pix and much more. Recorded live at the FGS conference in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, it's our annual Best Genealogy Websites episode. We're discussing our 101 best sites list, interviewing Daniel Horowitz from MyHeritage, chatting with Rick Voight from Vivid-Pix and much more. Don't miss this episode! F+W Media clean 25:44
DNA and Adoption: Podcast Episode 122 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/adoption/dna-adoption-episode-122/ Tue, 24 Jul 2018 19:03:19 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=29049 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/adoption/dna-adoption-episode-122/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/adoption/dna-adoption-episode-122/feed/ 0 <p>In this month’s podcast, we’re not only discussing DNA and adoption, but also premiering several new segments. Come check out the Family Tree Magazine Podcast’s facelift!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/genealogy_research_strategies/adoption/dna-adoption-episode-122/">DNA and Adoption: Podcast Episode 122</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p> dna adoption genealogy

Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

This Month in Family History

This month we’re turning the clock back 45 years to a disastrous event that lit up the hot July skies in 1973: the fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis Missouri. Theresa Fitzgerald, Chief, Archival Operations at the National Archives at St. Louis tells us all about it.

Resources: Read more about it in this recent article from our magazine

Visit the National Archives website


Social Media Minute

“Like” the Family Tree Magazine Facebook page

Website: Gedmatch


Feature

With the rise of DNA testing we’re seeing more and more articles published about adoptees locating and meeting their biological parents. Sunny Morton has written an article for the July / August issue of the magazine called One Man’s Successful Search for His Sperm Donor Father and she’s here to tell us about it.

3 Tips from Sunny:

  1. You’ll need advanced DNA strategies. You have to be willing to wait and to work the results
  2. Remember that traditional genealogical research still plays a large role and you research the trees of matches.
  3. Keep the human element in mind. Think about what you are looking for and your motivations for finding it. Keep expectations in check. Be sensitive to the perspective and lives of those you contact.

Read the article: One Man’s Successful Search for His Sperm-Donor Father.

More resource articles:Researching Orphan Children and Adoption in Your Genealogy

5 First Steps to Researching Your Own Adoption


DNA Deconstructed

DNA Testing for Adoptees and Anyone Searching for a Birth FamilyDNA Deconstructed: DNA Testing for Adoptees and Anyone Searching for a Birth Family
Many advances have made it possible for adoptees to search for answers using DNA more easily than they could even a few years ago. For instance:

  • Types of at-home DNA tests have increased and dropped in price
  • Genealogical data and documents are accessible online in larger frequencies for adoptees to do preliminary research
  • Thank to social media. many people are easier to track down now
  • And, adoptees are sharing their DNA stories publicly, through TV shows and other media giving many people hope for their own search.

Different approaches for different needs

What helps one person is not the same for all others. There are different approaches used by other adoptees or professionals in this field to find people and information they are searching for.

The catch in the testing pool is that someone related to you must have tested at the same company. An alternative to this is if a match has tested at a different company but has transferred their data to another matching website where your data has been transferred as well. A connection can only be made between your DNA sequence and someone else’s if your data in the same place for comparison. For this reason, genealogists recommend you “fish in all the ponds” if possible. In other words, the more places your DNA is, the greater the chance you will find someone you’re related to.

More family to meet

Since the introduction of DNA testing, more people beyond just the adoptee and birth parents are involved in searches and reunions. Searching now often includes biological siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, and even some grandparents, mostly because of the explosion of interest in DNA testing. Sometimes siblings, cousins, or grandchildren of a birth parent are identified by DNA testing. This change in the way people can meet requires balancing the needs of more people in a family than ever before.

Search angels are experienced researchers who volunteer their time to individual cases.

What is most important is that if you are going to test you have:

  • Patience
  • A good support community to turn to
  • And time to educate yourself on how (and if) DNA can help you

Best Genealogy Websites: ISOGG

Guest: Katherine Borges is the Co-Founder and Director of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG), which promotes and educates about genetic genealogy to over 20,000 members in over 70 countries. She works to increase professional standards in the practice, research, and discussion of relevant issues in DNA testing, interpretation, and ethics. Katherine gives many presentations on genetic genealogy to groups across the United States, the United Kingdom and in Ireland.

ISOGG is:

  • Totally user contributed
  • Best known for: Ysnp Tree, and ISOOG Wiki
  • Mailing Lists
  • Facebook group
  • DNA Newbie Group on Yahoo
  • Admin Projects

Katherine’s recommendations for getting started using the site:

  • Be goal specific
  • Develop a goal before you test
  • Don’t worry about having to know everything – ask questions and you’ll get answers

ISOOG Adoption resources: ISOGG Wiki

Recommendation:

Join the DNA Detective Facebook group. There you’ll find Search Angels who will make contacts for you as a third party.


Stories from the Stacks

At the top of the show we heard about the fire that occurred at the National Personnel Records Center back in 1973. So, in today’s “Stories from the Stacks” segment we  check back in with Theresa Fitzgerald, Chief of Archival Operations at the National Archives in St. Louis to find out more about the lost Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF) for the Army and Air Force.

Alternative auxiliary files available at the national archives include:

  • Deceased Veteran Claim Files which can include copies of some of the OMPF documents.
  • Army and Air Force Morning Reports

Tips on how to make the most of our visit the National Archives in St. Louis, MO

  • Make an appointment 6 weeks in advance to access the “Burn File” (AKA B File)
  • Bring your ID card

For more information visit their website.


This Just In


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

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The post DNA and Adoption: Podcast Episode 122 appeared first on Family Tree.

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In this month’s podcast, we’re not only discussing DNA and adoption, but also premiering several new segments. Come check out the Family Tree Magazine Podcast’s facelift! In this month’s podcast, we’re not only discussing DNA and adoption, but also premiering several new segments. Come check out the Family Tree Magazine Podcast’s facelift! F+W Media clean 20:38
Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Podcast: Episode 121 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/podcast-episode-121/ Thu, 28 Jun 2018 08:00:10 +0000 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/?p=28852 https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/podcast-episode-121/#respond https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/podcast-episode-121/feed/ 0 <p>The Family Tree Podcast is celebrating its 10 year anniversary! Join us as we discuss some of our favorite stories and interviews from the last decade. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/genealogy-industry/genealogy-podcasts/podcast-episode-121/">Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Podcast: Episode 121</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.familytreemagazine.com">Family Tree</a>.</p>  

family genealogy podcast anniversary
Listen to this Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode here: 

Back to the episode list


In This Episode

  • News from the Blogosphere: Diane’s favorite blogs over the years
  • Top Tips – Lisa’s favorite interviews from the last decade
  • NEW! – Social Media Minute
  • Family Tree University Crash Course – Organize Your Genealogy Research

Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke

Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s podcast, The Genealogy Gems Podcast in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.


family genealogy podcast anniversary

News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad

Diane discussed some of her favorite blog posts that she has shared over the last 10 years on the show:

Why Ancestry.com and other genealogy searches don’t work

Tabloid Divorces have nothing on these ancestors

6 strategies that helped me


family genealogy podcast anniversary

Top Tips

Host Lisa Louise Cooke digs into the archive and shares two of her favorite interviews from the past.

The first comes from Episode 83 which was published in April of 2015. The theme for the episode was source citation, and in the Family Tree University Crash Course segment Shannon Comb-Bennett, instructor of the Family Tree University: Source Citations for Regular People course made an eloquent case for citing your sources.

The other favorite interview was first published in March of 2014. In the 101 Best Websites Lisa got to cover one of her favorite websites, Digital Public Library of America. Lisa interviewed Dan Cohen, Executive Director of the DPLA, and he took us on a tour of this terrific website.

Related articles on the DPLA:

DPLA: Introduction to the Digital Public Library of America? by Lisa Louise Cooke
National Archives and Digital Public Library of America


family genealogy podcast anniversary

NEW! Social Media Minute with Rachel Fountain

In this episode we introduce a brand new segment devoted to genealogy on social media. Rachel shares some of her favorite podcast that you may want to start listening to as well:

Family Ghosts

Hardcore History

Genealogy Gems

Genealogy Guys

More Perfect

Follow Family Tree Magazine on social media:

Facebook

Twitter


family genealogy podcast anniversary

Family Tree University Crash Course

Lisa wraps things up on this episode with instructor Lisa Alzo, instructor of the course Organize Your Genealogy Research. It’s always a good time to get organized, and the two Lisas have got some great ideas for you.

The next session of Organize Your Genealogy Research starts July 16, 2018.

Register here!


Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Family History: Genealogy Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her Website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

The post Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Podcast: Episode 121 appeared first on Family Tree.

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The Family Tree Podcast is celebrating its 10 year anniversary! Join us as we discuss some of our favorite stories and interviews from the last decade. The Family Tree Podcast is celebrating its 10 year anniversary! Join us as we discuss some of our favorite stories and interviews from the last decade. F+W Media clean 45:04