Family History Hot Spots

Family History Hot Spots

Ready to take your roots research on the road? Put these 11 top stops on your genealogy itinerary.

Ready to take your roots research on the road? Put these 11 top stops on your genealogy itinerary:

Boston, Mass.

We’ve highlighted Beantown’s historical treasures, but we’d be remiss not to mention its genealogical gems, such as the New England Historic Genealogical Society (617-536-5740, <www.newenglandancestors.org>) and the Boston Public Library (617-536-5400, <www.bpl.org>). Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau: (888) 733-3678, <www.bostonusa.com>

Cincinnati, Ohio

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s (513-369-6905, <www.cincinnatilibrary.org/info/main/hi.asp>) vast History and Genealogy collection — noted for its African-American resources — makes this the Queen City of roots research. Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau: (800) 246-2987, <www.cincyusa.com>

Chicago, III.

You’ll be blown away by the Windy City’s family history facilities, including the Newberry Library (312-943-9090, <www.newberry.org>), a National Archives branch (773-948-9019, <www.archives.gov/facilities/il/chicago.html>) and plentiful places for researching your immigrant and ethnic ancestors. Chicago Convention and Tourism Bureau: (877) 244-2246, <www.chicago.il.org>

Denver, Colo.

The research possibilities reach a mile high in Denver, from the National Archives’ Rocky Mountain Region facility (303-407-5700, <www.archives.gov/facilities/co/denver.html>) to the Denver Public Library’s expansive Western History and Genealogy department (720-865-1821, <www.denver.lib.co.us/whg>). Denver Metro Convention and Visitors Bureau: (800) 233-6837, <www.denver.org>

Fort Wayne, Ind.

Discover family history’s public-library promised land: The Allen County Public Library (260-421-1225, <acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy>) boasts the second-largest genealogy collection in the nation. Fort Wayne/A/len County Convention and Visitors Bureau: (800) 767-7752, <www.visitfortwayne.com>

Houston, Texas

You’ll find family history resources flowing like black gold at the Houston Public Library’s Clayton Library, Center for Genealogical Research (832-393-2600, <www.houstonlibrary.org/clayton>). Greater Houston Convention and Visitors Bureau: (800) 446-8786, <www.houston-guide.com>

Independence, Mo.

Venture down ancestral trails at the Mid-Continent Public Library (816-252-7228, <www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/braCity of Independence, Mo., Touris Department: (800) 748-7323, <windependence.mo.us/tourism>

Knoxville, Tenn.

Put this town on your “ones to wa In fall 2005, the East Tennessee Hi Society will unveil a new research ce Knoxville Tourism and Sports Corp. (800) 727-8045, <www.knoxville.>

New York, NY

Bite into the Big Apple’s roots resou The American Family Immigration Center at Ellis Island (<www.ellisisla.org>), the New York Public Library (: 930-0828, <www.nypl.org/research chss/lhg/genea.html>), the New Yo Genealogical & Biographical Society (755-8532, <www.newyorkfamilyhisto org>) and a National Archives region; facility (212-401-1620, <www.archives gov/facilities/ny/new_york_city.htm> NYC and Company: (212) 484-1200, <www.nycvisit.com>

Salt Lake City, Utah

Take a journey to genealogy’s mecca. With the world’s biggest genealogical collection — the Family History Library (801-240-2331, <www.familysearch.org>) — at your fingertips, you won’t want this pilgrimage to end. Salt Lake Convention and Visitors Bureau (800) 541-4955, <www.visitsaltlake.com>

Washington, DC

Home to the National Archives (866-272-6272, <www.archives.gov>), Library of Congress (202-707-8000, <www.loc.gov>) and Daughters of the American Revolution Library (202-879-3229, <www.dar.org>), Washington’s also our capital city for family history. Washington, DC, Convention and Tourism Corp.: (800) 422-8644, <www.washington.org>

From the December 2004 Family Tree Magazine

Related Products

No Comments

Leave a Reply