Oklahoma Historic Sites

Oklahoma Historic Sites

Where to learn about your ancestors' lives in the Sooner State.

• Adams Corner Rural Village

21192 S. Keeler Drive

Park Hill, OK 74451

(888) 999-6007

<www.cherokeeheritage.org/default.aspx?tabid=278>

Operated by the Cherokee History Center, this living history museum depicts a typical rural area in Indian Territory around the turn of the century. See restored buildings including a church, log cabin, school house, smokehouse and more.

• Fort Gibson

907 N. Garrison Ave.

Fort Gibson, OK 74434

(918) 478.4088

<www.okhistory.org/outreach/military/fortgibson.html>

Built in 1824, this post was the starting point for several military expeditions. During the Indian Wars, soldiers here combatted outlaws and squatters. Tour the reconstructed early log fort and original buildings from later years.

• Museum of the Western Prairie

1100 Memorial Drive

Altus, OK 73521

<www.okhistory.org/outreach/museums/westernprairie.html>

This Oklahoma Historical Society museum focuses on the history of southwest Oklahoma from the time of the mammoth to the farmlands of today. Don’t miss the historical material and photographs in the Bernice Ford-Price Memorial Reference Library.

• National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

1700 NE 63rd St.

Oklahoma City, OK 73111

(405) 478-2250

<www.nationalcowboymuseum.org>

Art and artifacts at this expansive museum show the history of cowboys, the Western frontier, American Indians and the rodeo.

• No Man’s Land Museum

207 W. Sewell St.

Goodwell, OK 73939

(580) 349-2670

<www.okhistory.org/outreach/affiliates/nomans.html>

Until 1890, when it was attached to Oklahoma Territory, no state claimed the strip of land that’s now the Panhandle. This museum displays artifacts from the early days, including quilts, porcupine quillwork and the first printing press to cross the Mississippi.

• Oklahoma History Center

2401 N. Laird Ave.

Oklahoma City, OK 73105

(405) 522-5248

<www.okhistorycenter.org>

Witness Oklahoma’s story since prehistoric times. Special galleries detail local Indian history and natural resources exploration.

• Oklahoma Territorial Museum

402 E. Oklahoma Ave.

Guthrie, OK 73521

(405) 282-1889

<oklahomaterritorialmuseum.org>

Ready… set… go to this site’s exhibits on that thrilling first land run in Oklahoma. Then see how rural homesteaders and city dwellers lived in territorial days.

• Seminole Nation Museum

524 S. Wewoka Ave.

Wewoka, OK 74884

(405) 257-5580

<www.wewoka.com/museum.htm>

Wewoka (“barking waters”) is the capital of the Seminole nation, whose members arrived in Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears. This museum tells of its settlements and residents.

Visitor Information

• Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department

120 N. Robinson Ave., Sixth Floor

Oklahoma City, OK 73102

(800) 652-6552

<www.travelok.com>

 
From the September 2008 Family Tree Magazine

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