Pay Up for MyFamily.com Web Sites

Pay Up for MyFamily.com Web Sites

You now have to pay for your Web space — that is, if you want more than 5MB of storage for family photographs, documents and other content.

Pay Up for MyFamily.com Web Sites

If you’re one of millions whose family Web site is hosted by MyFamily.com, you now have to pay for your Web space — that is, if you want more than 5MB of storage for family photographs, documents and other content. MyFamily.com now offers “premium sites” for $19.95 a year, which include 100MB of storage space, e-mail accounts and no advertisements. Webmasters who don’t want to pay for premium service will not have e-mail accounts, will be limited to 5MB of Web space and will continue to see banner ads on their sites. If you’re already an Ancestry subscriber, the premium Web site from MyFamily.com is included in your subscription. Learn more about this new service at <www.myfamily.com>; for other Web hosting options.

Charleston, SC, Virginia and San Francisco are all planning new museums to recognize the struggles and triumphs of African-Americans:

• In Charleston, which was the principal port of entry for African slaves into British North America, the mayor is working on two projects that will tell the story of slavery, according to the New York Times. A downtown building that was once the site of slave auctions is already being renovated to become a museum. Also, a much larger museum that would focus on the history of slavery is under consideration.

• The governor of Virginia is looking for a home for a national slavery museum. Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, the nation’s first elected black governor and grandson of slaves, envisions a museum that would cost $100 million to $200 million and attract 2 million visitors annually, the Associated Press says.

• City residents will have a hand in shaping the new African American Museum of San Francisco. The museum’s planners held public meetings this fall to ask citizens what the museum should showcase, the AP says. It could become a place to honor black artists, history or some combination of the two.

From the February 2002 issue of Family Tree Magazine

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