AncestorNews: Hoosier Genealogy

AncestorNews: Hoosier Genealogy

Want to learn a little about your Indiana county? Check out the Indiana County History Preservation Society, a part-free, part subscription ($10 a year) site that's chock full of historical tidbits. The free stuff includes overviews of all of Indiana's counties that tell you about its formation, townships, historical...

Want to learn a little about your Indiana county? Check out the Indiana County History Preservation Society, a part-free, part subscription ($10 a year) site that’s chock full of historical tidbits. The free stuff includes overviews of all of Indiana’s counties that tell you about its formation, townships, historical maps and military histories. For the $10 annual subscription, you also get access to 4,200 historical Indiana images and a searchable database of more than 5,600 Indiana biographies.

Why do so many of us have Indiana ancestors? For one thing, the National Road (the original US interstate) entered Indiana beginning in 1827, becoming the principal route for moving people and goods from the east to St. Louis. If your Eastern ancestor had an itchy foot, it’s possible he traveled the National Road to his new Indiana home. Also, Indiana is bordered on the south by Kentucky—it was an appealing next stop for Kentucky and Virginia settlers (my family included).

Want to find more free Indiana resources? Try these sites.

Indiana County Links at Linkpendium
www.linkpendium.com/genealogy/USA/IN

USGenWeb Census Project Indiana
199.8.200.229/db/marriages_search.asp

Indiana Marriages through 1850
www.census-online.com

Database of Indiana Servicemen in World War II
199.8.200.229/db/wwii_search.asp

Indiana Civil War Rosters
www.geocities.com/Area51/Lair/3680/cw/cw-in.html

Reader Tip for Pre-1850 Censuses
A few AncestorNews columns ago, I told you my method for working with pre-1850 censuses, which recorded only heads of households, and asked for your tips. Here’s one from Diane Murach:

I developed a similar system and form for the pre-1850 census records. My exception is the column where I write the name of the possible child/wife/parent, etc. I add notes as to whether the family is complete, a child died, parents or others are living with the family, etc.? I really use the early census records much more nowadays, mainly by naming candidates for the heads of the family who I’ll need to peruse in my research.

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