Resource Roundup: New Free Databases

Resource Roundup: New Free Databases

What’s the resource genealogists crave most? Free online data. Luckily, state archives, genealogy societies and volunteers frequently post new data on the web—such as these six resources.

What’s the resource genealogists crave most? Free online data. Luckily, state archives, genealogy societies and volunteers frequently post new data on the web—such as these six resources. Hungry for more? Look for a guide to the best state websites in the December 2010 Family Tree Magazine, and learn about databases releases as they happen on the Genealogy Insider blog.
 

1. Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive

The Georgia Historic Newspapers website added digitized pages from 14 newspapers published in Atlanta from 1847 to 1922. You can keyword-search the full text of the entire collection or an individual title, or browse issues by title and year. (You may need to download the DJVu Plugin to view articles.)
 

2. Early Oregonians Database
Looking for Oregon pioneers? This Oregon State Archives database holds 150,000 entries on Oregon residents from 1800 to 1860. (Few American Indians are represented, however, due to lack of records.) The data come from census, death, probate and other records.

 
Sources in this Missouri History Museum index include steamboat portage lists (payrolls), local military rosters, graduation programs, company newsletters and more. Search the index, which references primarily St. Louisians, by name, business name, street address or data source. Click to order a copy of the original document.
 

4. Minnesota Official Marriage System
Learn when your Minnesota ancestors said “I do” by searching this index. Results show the county holding the original record, so you know where to send a request. Coverage dates vary by county but go into the 1800s for many places—see <www.mncounty.com/countyinfo.aspx> for a breakdown.

 

5. Mormon Immigration Index

The Brigham Young University library has posted data from the Mormon Immigration Index CD (first published in 2000) here. The ancestral information comes from immigrants’ accounts, passenger lists and other resources documenting Europeans (especially from the British Isles) who became Mormons and immigrated to the United States.
 

6. New York National Guard Records

Two big National Guard record collections come courtesy of the New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center. The digitized records include 197 issues of the New York National Guardsman (published monthly from 1924 to 1940) and annual Adjutant General reports (1858 to 1955). The records aren’t searchable, but many years of the Adjutant General records have name indexes.
 
From the September 2010 Family Tree Magazine 

Related Products

No Comments

Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>